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Tights

Tights

The more expensive the tights are, the higher their quality. Unfortunately, this statement does not always correspond to the true state of affairs. Sometimes expensive tights are inferior to cheaper models by some indicators (elasticity, softness, strength).

The more denominations on the package, the stronger the tights. This is not entirely true. The number Den (abbreviation for denie - a parameter indicating the real density of the fiber), indicated on the package, is not a guarantee of strength.

Only black tights can leave a black mark on the legs. This is not true. Dispersion-red-3 and dispersion-orange - the dyes used in the production of tights and lingerie and coloring your legs can be found in products not only black, but also flesh-colored. Moreover, the above substances can be used both for the manufacture of cheap tights and for the production of expensive products from prestigious companies.

If tights leave a trace of dye on the legs, it's okay, after a couple of washings this effect will disappear. No, washing does not eliminate this effect. In addition, "dispersion tights" can cause allergies (they can cause itching, redness of the skin, the appearance of weeping blisters).

The best tights are labeled PA (RA) or 3D. These inscriptions carry completely different information. Tights are usually made from polyamide and elastane or lycra. PA (RA) means that in front of you is a product made of 100% polyamide (most often such tights are characterized by insufficient elasticity and after a while they stretch strongly). The 3D designation indicates that tights have three times the amount of elastane (or lycra, with the appropriate logo) than regular tights. Accordingly, the elasticity of such tights is much higher than the product with the designation PA.

It is written "with lycra" means with lycra. Unfortunately, the inscriptions are not always worth believing. It should be remembered that domestic manufacturers do not have permission to use "Lycra only by DuPont", nor special equipment for weaving lycra threads into yarn, which means that the inscription "with lycra" on the packaging of such a product is one hundred percent swindle.

Lycra tights overly restrict movement, squeeze, and are uncomfortable to wear. No, if the product is made in accordance with the technology and the size and type of tights are correctly selected. Discomfort may arise, for example, if, instead of the usual tights with lycra, you have purchased special medical tights with a retractable effect, indispensable in the treatment of varicose veins, but not entirely comfortable for everyday wear.

Lycra tights tend to stretch a lot, so it's best to get a smaller size. Any tights (with or without lycra) are best purchased in your normal size. If you purchase a piece that is one size smaller, this can lead to excessive stretching of the tights, which can be a source of discomfort for you and negatively affect the durability of the purchased item.

Lycra tights are too hot. If you are too hot in tights, choose models in which lycra does not match wool or cotton. In addition, it should be remembered that tights on which are indicated from 30 to 60 den are warmer than products made of thinner threads.

Tights shine - so with lycra. In fact, the shine, density and some other properties of tights depend on the type of polyamide threads used in the manufacture of these products.

Lycra® and elastane are one and the same. Elastane (or spandex) is the generic name for all synthetic elastic yarns, and DuPont's Lycra® is just one type of yarn.

At all times, tights have been a piece of women's clothing. The prototype of tights - pantaloons (chausses) were sewn from linen, wool, silk, thin leather and were part of men's clothing. In the 16th century, hand-knitted stockings (and since 1589 - knitted on a loom) were widespread, which were decorated with embroidered color inserts, ribbons, etc. And in the wardrobe of a real knight, not only warm, but also chain mail stockings, which are part of the armor and designed to protect their owner in battle, were necessarily present.

A man wearing pantyhose is somewhat of a drag queen. Completely misconception. Tights and socks are unisex clothes, in addition, there are tights designed specifically for men. And, finally, it should be remembered that tights and stockings are primordially men's clothing (only relatively recently migrated to the wardrobes of the beautiful half of humanity).

The man in tights is most likely gay. Not necessary. Firstly, as already mentioned, there are men's tights, and secondly, even if a man uses items from a woman's wardrobe, he is most likely not gay, but (according to research) heterosexual. And, thirdly, not all gays dress in women's clothes, so one should not evaluate a man's orientation only by his wardrobe.

Epilation is done only by women, men (even if they wear tights) do not need this procedure. Firstly, more and more men (especially those involved in sports and bodybuilding) do hair removal, while not losing their masculinity and in no way being like the weaker sex. And secondly, even men who prefer ordinary socks appreciated the effect of epilation - the socks stay on their feet better, and there is less skin irritation. Therefore, epilation is still desirable (especially if the color of the hair on the legs is very different from the color of the tights worn by the man).

Tights have a strong tight-fitting effect and can cause overheating in the groin area, which is harmful to men's health. You just need to choose the right size and type of tights (some of which have a healing effect, doctors recommend using them for male patients) - and you will be completely relieved of the "squeezing" effect. Much more dangerous in this sense are excessively tight jeans, underpants and underpants, which give a much greater effect of tight-fitting and heating.


Watch the video: Men in Tights Song (May 2021).